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I was recently asked by a casual darter as I picked up several sets of my darts from the post office "what does it take to get good enough to hit what you want?"

My answer was "time".

Her reply was "time? as in take your time when you throw?"

I answered: No, but rather time on the board.

You see, while everyone is different I think time is the real difference in making an accurate dart player. It takes a lot of time just hitting the board over and over again to develop your throw. So take the time, hit the board often, then hit it more and more and more. Wear the board out, get a new board and do it again and again.

In time, you will develop your throw and accuracy but don't get discourage too early. Some, like me, have spent more time throwing darts than others have spent working!

Play often, practice more, and let time do it's thing.
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Here
at SEWA Darts, we bring you the hottest news from darts sporting events
and more. Read on for breaking news, stories, championship previews,
top tips, features, columns and an in-depth look at the sport.

If you follow only one resource to get your dart fix, this is it! Let’s dive right into the latest news and stats right here.If you are looking for the latest on darts bust-ups, beatings, wins and victories, we have it all.

Here at SEWA Darts, we bring you the hottest news from darts sporting events and more. Read on for breaking news, stories, championship previews, top tips, features, columns and an in-depth look at the sport.

If you follow only one resource to get your dart fix, this is it! Let’s dive right into the latest news and stats right here.
Gerwyn
Price’s decision to give up rugby to become a professional darts player
is paying dividends as the 30-year-old clinched the Worthington’s 2015
Darts Champion of Champions title and a check for £5,000 at the
weekend.

Price,
who played for Cross Keys, Neath and Glasgow during his rugby career,
won eight matches to emerge from the pack of 256 pub and club champions
from across the UK in front of a partisan audience at grand final held
at St David’s Hall, Cardiff. Ranked 30 in the Professional Darts Corporation (PDC), his aim is to get promoted into the world’s top 16 players next year.Gerwyn Price's decision to give up rugby to become a professional darts player is paying dividends as the 30-year-old clinched the Worthington's 2015 Darts Champion of Champions title and a check for £5,000 at the weekend.
Price, who played for Cross Keys, Neath and Glasgow during his rugby career, won eight matches to emerge from the pack of 256 pub and club champions from across the UK in front of a partisan audience at grand final held at St David's Hall, Cardiff.
Ranked 30 in the Professional Darts Corporation (PDC), his aim is to get promoted into the world's top 16 players next year.
Price, who lives in Markham, Caerphilly, was delighted to win the Champion of Champions contest, which is organised by Bridgend-based darts specialists Red Dragon Darts and Ebbw Vale-based pay-to-play entertainment equipment supplier Coinspinner with sponsorship from Molson Coors.
The competition was run on a best of three legs, 501 shoot-out format - the same as the former 'News of The World' competition - giving pub players a chance to beat the professionals before they had warmed up. Prize money totalling nearly £18,000 attracted players from as far away as Scotland and London.
"Unbelievable," was Price's initial response after beating fellow PDC top 100 player Ian Moss from Morden, Surrey 2-0 in the final. "To be honest,...
Have you ever really thought about practice and how it impacts your darts? Have you thought about practicing but really didn't want to record what you were doing? Decided you didn't like a certain game? Chose to change the rules to make it more 'fun'?

I've been thinking about the psychology of practice for some time and one thing that keeps coming back to me is that it's very easy to succumb to the 'easy' or the negatives and very difficult at times to break through them.
One thing that catches my eye a lot, and I know I'll catch hell for
mentioning it, is the tendency of many players to modify the rules of
'Bob's 27' or just not play it because they don't like losing. Losing
is what I said too because the rule they change, like it or not, is the
part where you must stop and go back to the start when you fail to
maintain positive points which is technically losing. (example, you
start at 27, lose 2 on the 1, lose 4 on the 2, lose 6 on the 3 and 8 on
the 4 and are sitting at only 7 points remaining when you miss the
double 5 and at this point should start over but choose to change the
game and allow yourself to go 'negative' so as to not 'lose').

This
game is hard, it's brutal and it's going to make you lose OVER and OVER
again until you get better but many choose to either not play it or to
change the rules and I wonder about that way of thinking. I don't want
this to be about Bob's 27 though so let's not get too deep in the woods
here. To that end I'll shift focus: recording practice.

Another
tendency that I see in myself and in others is to not want to record a
practice session because as soon as you start some darn switch flips in
your brain and you began to shoot like crap -- ever do this? I do.

It
takes me some serious effort to break past this barrier and not allow
it to stop me from practicing but it only occurs when I've not been
practicing for some time and am not playing well. I step to the...
I've been thinking lately that the key to playing darts well are the habits we establish. One, of course, can also say the key to NOT playing well is also the habits we form.

For example the player who routinely kicks has a habit of kicking and thus is unstable at the line. Just like the player who tosses his throwing arm to the left after each throw has a habit of doing so and likely misses to the left more than he/she should. However, how often do we consider the good habits of playing darts?

For example the player who routinely stays motionless at the oche except his/her throwing arm is likely to be very stable. The player who has a habit of always releasing the same way every throw with the same follow through will likely have a very good average.

I think the point here is to remember that there are good and bad habits and habits take both time to create and time to break. So, if you are trying to improve your game take a look at your habits and ask yourself: is this a good or bad habit?

The good ones keep, the bad ones get rid of!

Now, it is said that it takes 7 days to make a habit and 28 days to get rid of it...bear that in mind as you work to develop good habits and get rid of bad ones.